Category Archives for "Disease Prevention"

Vitamins and Minerals Women Need To Take

Vitamins and Minerals Women Need To Take

Vitamins and Minerals Women Need To Take

Of course you eat healthy, using only fresh organic fruits and vegetables while avoiding fast food and fattening desserts. But how do you know you are getting everything your body needs from the supermarket? And what about supplements? Do you need to be taking them everyday as well?

 

As it turns out, women need different amounts of vitamins and minerals at various stages of life. According to studies, these are the vitamins and minerals women need to take.

According to the National Institutes of Health, more than half of American adults take at least one dietary supplement, most commonly a multivitamin. This is a good place to start if you think you are not getting all the nutrients you need from your diet. But keep in mind, dietary supplements are intended to supplement the diet, not to cure, prevent or treat diseases or replace the variety of foods important to a healthy diet.

Our nutritional needs change as we move through different stages of life, so consider a multivitamin targeted for women in your age group. It should contain B vitamins; vitamins A, C, D, E and K; and various minerals, such as calcium and magnesium. Also remember that to be fit and healthy, adjust your diet, as well as your vitamin and supplement intake, to meet the extra demands placed on your body and the vitamins and minerals women need to take.

19 to 30 Years of Age

Calcium

Calcium builds strong bones, but is also important for healthy muscles, nerves and heart. Women should be careful to get enough calcium throughout life, but you want to build bone density in your 20s because the body will lose some of that bone in later years. The more you start with, the better off you are. You need 1,000 milligrams of calcium per day while you are in your 20s. Consider taking a calcium supplement if you don’t receive enough calcium from your diet through dairy products, calcium-fortified orange juice and cereals, beans, leafy greens, almonds and salmon.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D, like calcium, is essential for bone health and may reduce the risk of some cancers and heart disease. It also promotes calcium absorption in the stomach and intestines. Good sources of vitamin D include salmon, tuna and fortified milk, juices and cereals. With the help of sunshine, most of the vitamin D we get is made in the skin. If you are almost always indoors and get little or no sunshine on your skin, however, you may need to consult your doctor or dietitian about your vitamin D needs. Online Table 1 shows the recommended daily allowances for calcium and vitamin D in women.

Recommended Dietary Allowances for Calcium and Vitamin D in Women
Age (years) Calcium Vitamin D
19-30 1000 mg 600 IU
31-50 1000 mg 600 IU
51-70 1200 mg 600 IU
71+ 1200 mg 600 IU
Source: Pharmacy Times

Iron

Iron helps increase the amount of red blood cells in the body and keep blood healthy. Women with heavy menstrual bleeding or pregnant women need more iron in their diets or may need an iron supplement. Too little iron may lead to anemia. Iron comes from animal sources (heme iron) and plant sources (nonheme iron). Heme iron (from animal sources) is better absorbed than iron from plant sources. However, the absorption of iron from plant sources can be improved when these foods are eaten in combination with foods rich in vitamin C (such as orange juice, strawberries or green, yellow or red peppers). Animal sources include meat, fish and eggs. Plant sources include nuts, seeds and dark leafy green vegetables. Women 19 to 50 years of age need 18 mg of iron daily, pregnant women need 27 mg of iron daily, and women 51 years and older need 8 mg every day. Definitely vitamins and minerals women need to take.

31 to 50 Years of Age

 

Magnesium

Magnesium is important throughout each stage of life because it supports hundreds of functions throughout the body, including tooth and bone formation, growth, physical and cognitive development and ensuring a healthy pregnancy. Magnesium is especially important for women older than 40 years, as it builds strong bones and prevents bone loss that may lead to osteoporosis. Magnesium may also help regulate blood pressure and blood sugar levels, reducing the risk of heart disease and diabetes. Legumes, nuts, seeds, whole grains, fortified cereals and leafy green vegetables (like spinach) are good sources of magnesium. See Online Table 2 for the recommended daily allowances for magnesium.

Recommended Dietary Allowances for Magnesium in Women
Age (years) Magnesium Pregnancy Lactation
19-30 310 mg 350 mg 310 mg
31-50 320 mg 360 mg 320 mg
51+ 320 mg
Source: Pharmacy Times

50 Years and Older

Calcium

As you approach menopause, your body produces less estrogen, putting you at increased risk for heart disease, osteoporosis and other complications. To build and maintain healthy bones, weight-bearing and muscle strengthening exercises are important. In addition to exercise, be sure to get the recommended vitamins and minerals women need to take, which is 1,200 mg of calcium for women 50 years and older.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is necessary for the absorption of calcium and is the essential companion to calcium in maintaining strong bones. The recommended daily intake of vitamin D is 600 IU after age 50 years, increasing to 800 IU after age 70.

Fish Oil

Fish oil, found in cold-water, oily fish — such as salmon, mackerel and sardines — is a rich source of the two essential omega-3 fatty acids: EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid). Studies indicate omega-3s may reduce the risk and symptoms of various disorders, including heart attack, stroke, some cancers and rheumatoid arthritis. The American Heart Association recommends eating fish, especially oily fish, at least two times each week as part of a heart-healthy diet. Although omega-3 supplements have not been shown to protect against heart disease, there is evidence that eating seafood has a variety of health benefits. If you cannot eat fish or choose to not do so, talk to your health care provider to see if a fish oil supplement is right for you.

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 helps your body make red blood cells and keeps the brain and nervous system healthy. This vitamin is found mostly in animal protein: meats, fish, dairy products and eggs. It can also be found in fortified breakfast cereals. As you get older, you can develop a reduced ability to absorb vitamin B12. If you become deficient, you may experience confusion, agitation or hallucinations. Almost all multivitamins contain vitamin B12. Supplements that contain only vitamin B12 or vitamin B12 in combination with other nutrients, as well as a prescription form that is administered as a shot, are also vitamins and minerals women need to take.

When deciding what vitamins and minerals women need to take, consult with your doctor before making any significant changes to your diet or health regimen. Same goes for women who are pregnant or breast feeding.

 

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/vitamins-minerals-essentials-women-130000710.html;_ylt=AwrXoCHvz5pV0wIApDPQtDMD;_ylu=X3oDMTByb2lvbXVuBGNvbG8DZ3ExBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDBHNlYwNzcg–

 

 

 

 

Essential Oils For Use Against Superbugs

Essential Oils For Use Against Superbugs: Which oils kill Antibiotic resistant Bacteria?

Essential Oils For Use Against Superbugs

You may have heard about this in the past, superbugs are created through antibiotic overuse, both by doctors who rely too heavily on antibiotics and by today’s modern industrial farming practices. There are in fact some essential oils that have the power to kill antibiotic resistant bacteria.

Lemongrass is widely used in Chinese and Thai cooking but it can also relieve aches and pains, as an insect repellent and and a bacteria killer.

The citral and limonene content in lemongrass oil can kill or stifle the growth of bacteria and fungi. This will help you avoid getting infections such as ringworm, athlete’s foot, or other types of fungus. Studies in rats have proved that lemongrass essential oil is an effective antifungal and antibacterial agent.

Additional research found that lemongrass oil could reduce MRSA.

A US study found tea-tree oil was a more effective treatment for staph-infected wounds than conventional treatments.

While many across the country are concerned about measles, which occurs in a largely vaccinated population and has caused no deaths, a larger threat wasn’t receiving proper attention: drug-resistant tuberculosis—and antibiotic-resistant “superbugs” in general. These infect at least two million Americans each year and kill 23,000, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

These Essential Oils For Use Against Superbugs can help keep your family healthy year round without using potentially harmful over the counter or prescription drugs.

Sources:

http://www.bioline.org.br/abstract?id=pr13110

http://draxe.com/lemongrass-essential-oil/